Posted: 01.15.2006
Updated: 06.25.2011
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CHOKING GAME
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FACTS OF THE CHOKING GAME

SLANG TERMS
(VARY BY DEMOGRAPHIC)
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Youth who might participate range in age from 7-21 and it is especially common in middle school aged children. Survey data indicate boys and girls are equally likely to participate in groups but boys are more likely to attempt it alone. The goal is a desired 'floaty', 'tingling', 'high' sensation. However, not all participants are seeking a 'high' , some participate as a pass time, out of curiosity, or as a result of peer pressure.  Many do not perceive a risk when engaging in this practice.
 
Unlike AeA (auto erotic asphyxia), 'Choking Game' does not involve a sexual component.

The object of the 'game' is asphyxiation, as in, to apply pressure restricting oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain. This is accomplished several methods. Diminishing oxygen to the brain produces a sensation or 'high' and the beginning of permanent cell death. When the victim is rendered unconscious, the pressure is released and the secondary 'high' of the oxygen/blood rushing to the brain is achieved. If the victim is alone - upon unconsciousness there is no one to release the pressure and the victims own body weight continues to tighten the ligature usually resulting in death.
5 minutes of Heaven, 7 Minutes 'Til Heaven, Accupuncture Game, Airplaning, America dream(ing), Black out, Black Hole, California High, Choke Out, Cloud Nine (9), Dream (Game), Elevator (Game), Fainting game, Flatline game, Flat liner (Game), Funky Chicken, Gasp (ing) (Game), Good kids Game, Hang (ing) (Man) Game, Harvey Wall banger, High riser (Game), Huff (ing) (Game), Hyperventilating , Knock-Out (Game), Lions and Tigers, Pass(ing) Out (Game), Purple Dragon, Rising Sun, Rush, Sleeping Game, Sleeper Hold, Snuff (Game), Something dreaming, Space cowboy, Space monkey, Speed Dreaming, Suffocation (Game), Tap Out, Teen choking game, Tingling game, Twitching Game.

Some kids don't by name - "want to do that game?"

METHODS

Bear hug Chest compression (group), Palms to Chest compression (group) , Choke Hold neck Compression (group), Hyperventilation combined with any of the previously mentioned (group) , Palms to Carotid Neck Compression (group and solo), Hyperventilation with Thumb Blow (solo) , Thumb Blow (solo), Ligature (solo).
Warning sings may or may not be present
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CONSEQUENCES
Unconsciousness can occur in a matter of seconds. Within three minutes of continued strangulation, basic functions such as memory, balance, and the central nervous system start to fail. Death occurs shortly after. Other consequences include bruises and concussions, broken bones. seizures, brain damage, memory loss, retinal hemorrhaging, and stroke.

"Typical" PROFILE

Unlike other risk-taking behaviors, self-choking often occurs across the spectrum of adolescents. 9 -16 is the most common age and it is predominantly male participants who are the fatal victims. Although younger and older adolescents along with females are involved.
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